Cart

All Posts By

Laura Martlock

Chesapeake Horse Tests Positive for Eastern Equine Encephalitis and West Nile Virus

By Informational Articles and News

VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND CONSUMER SERVICES

OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS, Contact: Michael Wallace, 804.786.1904, www.vdacs.virginia.gov

 

For Immediate Release

Monday, August 17, 2020

 

Chesapeake Horse Tests Positive for Eastern Equine Encephalitis and West Nile Virus

 

The Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (VDACS) confirms that a horse, stabled in Chesapeake, VA, tested positive for Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE) and West Nile Virus (WNV). The female quarter horse was euthanized on August 7 after showing severe neurological symptoms. No other horses on the farm are showing symptoms of EEE or WNV.

VDACS encourages horse owners to speak with their veterinarians about vaccinating their horses for EEE and WNV. The mortality rate for WNV is 30 percent and up to 90 percent for EEE. Vaccinations are effective for six to 12 months.

Both EEE and WNV are mosquito-borne illnesses. Typical symptoms include staggering, circling, depression, loss of appetite and sometimes fever and blindness. There is no cure for the disease, but it can be prevented through vaccination. Other prevention methods include destroying standing water breeding sites for mosquitoes, use of insect repellents, and removing animals from mosquito-infested areas during peak biting times, usually dusk to dawn. Once a horse has been bitten by an infected mosquito, it may take three to ten days for signs of the disease to appear.

For more information on how to control mosquitoes around horses, please visit vdacs.virginia.gov/animals-eastern-equine-encephalitis.shtml. Horse owners may also contact VDACS’ Office of Veterinary Services at 804.786.2483 or consult their local veterinarian.

 

Michael Wallace
Director of Communications
Va. Dept. of Agriculture and Consumer Services
102 Governor St.
Richmond VA 23219
804.786.1904

Fauquier County Horse Tests Positive for Equine Herpesvirus-1

By Informational Articles and News

VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

AND CONSUMER SERVICES

OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS, www.vdacs.virginia.gov

 

Contact:  Michael Wallace, 804.786.1904

For Release: June 18, 2020

Fauquier County Horse Test Positive for Equine Herpesvirus-1

 

On June 16, the State Veterinarian’s Office of the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (VDACS) received a report from an equine veterinary clinic that they confirmed a horse in their clinic tested positive for Equine Herpesvirus-1 (EHV-1). EHV-1 is the virus that causes Equine Herpes Myeloencephalopathy.

The infected horse had been treated in isolation at the clinic for a few days before acutely showing neurologic signs. The horse was subsequently euthanized. The clinic practiced approved biosecurity protocol at all times during the horse’s stay. No other horses at the clinic were exposed and the clinic remains open to patients.

The horse originated from a private farm in Fauquier County. The farm and the neighboring farm, that shares a fence line, have both been placed under quarantine. All exposed horses on the farms are being monitored twice daily for fever (temperature over 101.5 0 F) and other clinical signs. None of the horses on either property are showing signs of illness. No trail riding is conducted through either property that could have exposed other horses. No additional Virginia horses have been exposed as none of the horses from either property had contact with other horses in the two weeks leading up to the illness in the index horse.

There is no cause for alarm concerning the general horse population in Virginia. EHV-1 is a virus that is present in the environment and found in most horses all over the world. Horses typically are exposed to the virus at a young age with no serious side effects. A large percent of horses carry the virus with no clinical signs for the remainder of their lives. Rarely, exposed horses develop the neurologic form of the disease. Horse owners with concerns should contact their veterinarian.

The Equine Disease Communications Center Biosecurity website, equinediseasecc.org/biosecurity, has more information on best practices for disease prevention in horses. More information on EHV-1 is available at vdacs.virginia.gov/animals-equine- herpes-virus.shtml. Horse owners also may contact VDACS’ Office of Veterinary Services at 804.786.2483.

 

Michael Wallace
Director of Communications
Va. Dept. of Agriculture and Consumer Services
102 Governor St.
Richmond VA 23219
804.786.1904

Phase Two Requirements for Horse and Livestock Shows

By Informational Articles and News
The VHC has received a number of inquiries about the status of equine businesses during the current COVID-19 crisis.  As of June 16, the Governor has updated requirements for equine public events.  Please click on the link  below for the Virginia Phase Two guidelines for horse and other livestock shows that was just released by Governor Northam.

CLICK HERE FOR THE PHASE TWO FOR HORSE AND OTHER LIVESTOCK SHOWS INFORMATION

If you have further questions please contact your local authorities for guidance.  For those equine businesses suffering economic losses we suggest that you contact your accountants and bankers.  There are resources available through SBA to see businesses through these turbulent times.
 As the situation evolves and if and when we have additional information we will share it with you.
We recognize that this will be a time of financial hardship that may result in the inability of some horse owners to provide food for their horses.  If you find yourself in this situation please contact the VHC office.  We will make every effort to see if we can put you in touch with sources that can provide you with relief.
If you have any questions or concerns please contact the VHC office.

Cost Share Programs for Farmers

By Informational Articles and News

The Thomas Jefferson Soil and Water Conservation District, is trying to get information about their programs out to Ag landowners. These programs are available for horse farms, as well as other landowners, and they are excited to work with and provide technical assistance to landowners in the equine community.

This district covers Albemarle, Fluvanna, Louisa, and Nelson county. They offer cost share programs to farmers who are interested in implementing conservation practices. These programs help with erosion control, grazing management, and improvements to soil and water health. Some of the programs include; exclusion fencing, providing alternative watering systems, converting ag land to forest, and planting riparian buffers.

This year the Thomas Jefferson Soil and Water Conservation District has received $2.3 million dollars of cost share funding to work with producers and landowners, and are therefore able to offer cost share to many more interested farmers. Any farmers who are interested can go to the website https://www.tjswcd.org/ or call Lisa Hyatt at (434) 975-0224 ext 110. Feel free to contact them if you have any questions about these programs or what they do!

CONTACT:

Audrey Kirschner
Agriculture Administrative and Outreach Assistant
Thomas Jefferson Soil and Water Conservation District
705 Dale Ave.
Charlottesville, VA 22903
Phone: 434-975-0224 ext. 105
Fax: 434-975-1367

www.tjswcd.org

 

INFORMATIONAL FLYER

Virginia Horse Test Positive for Equine Herpesvirus-1

By Informational Articles and News

VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND CONSUMER SERVICES

OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS, www.vdacs.virginia.gov

Contact: Elaine Lidholm, 804.786.7686

For Release: March 18, 2020

Virginia Horse Test Positive for Equine Herpesvirus-1

 

On March 17, the State Veterinarian’s Office of the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (VDACS) confirmed one horse tested positive for Equine Herpesvirus-1 (EHV-1), the virus that causes Equine Herpes Myeloencephalopathy. The infected horse was at a boarding stable in Amelia County. The horse is receiving medical care and is stable. The boarding stable has been placed under quarantine. All exposed horses on the farm are being monitored twice daily for fever (temperature over 101.50 F) and other clinical signs. No additional Virginia horses have been exposed.

There is no cause for alarm concerning the general horse population in Virginia. EHV-1 is a virus that is present in the environment and found in most horses all over the world. Horses typically are exposed to the virus at a young age with no serious side effects. A large percent of horses carry the virus with no clinical signs for the remainder of their lives. Rarely, exposed horses develop the neurologic form of the disease. Horse owners with concerns should contact their veterinarian.

 

Visit the Equine Disease Communications Center website for more information on biosecurity and best practices for disease prevention in horses. VDACS has EHV-1 information online or horse owners may contact VDACS’ Office of Veterinary Services at 804.786.2483.

 

Michael Wallace

Assistant Director of Communications

Va. Dept. of Agriculture and Consumer Services

102 Governor St.

Richmond VA 23219

804.786.1904

Virginia Horse Tests Positive for Equine Herpesvirus-1

By Informational Articles and News

VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND CONSUMER SERVICES

OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS, www.vdacs.virginia.gov

Contact: Elaine Lidholm, 804.786.7686

For Release: Monday, Feb. 24, 2020

Virginia Horse Tests Positive for Equine Herpesvirus-1

 

On Friday February 21, the State Veterinarian’s Office of the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (VDACS) confirmed one horse tested positive for Equine Herpesvirus-1 (EHV-1), the virus that causes Equine Herpes Myeloencephalopathy. The infected horse was at a boarding stable in Powhatan County. The boarding stable has been placed under quarantine.

No horses had left the property in at least two weeks. All exposed horses are being monitored twice daily for fever (temperature over 101.50 F) and other clinical signs. No additional Virginia horses have been exposed.

There is no cause for alarm concerning the general horse population in Virginia. EHV-1 is a virus that is present in the environment and found in most horses all over the world. Horses typically are exposed to the virus at a young age with no serious side effects. A large percent of horses carry the virus with no clinical signs for the remainder of their lives. Rarely, exposed horses develop the neurologic form of the disease. Horse owners with concerns should contact their veterinarian.

The Equine Disease Communications Center Biosecurity web pages www.equinediseasecc.org/biosecurity have more information on best practices for disease prevention in horses and VDACS has more information on EHV-1 at www.vdacs.virginia.gov/animals-equine-herpes-virus.shtml. Horse owners also may contact VDACS’ Office of Veterinary Services at 804.786.2483.

 

Elaine Lidholm

Director of Communications

Va. Dept. of Agriculture and Consumer Services

102 Governor St.

Richmond VA 23219

804.786.7686

State Veterinarian’s Office Lifts EHM Quarantine

By Informational Articles and News

VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND CONSUMER SERVICES

OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS, www.vdacs.virginia.gov

 

Contact: Michael Wallace, 804.786.1904

 

For Release: Friday, Dec. 6, 2019

 

State Veterinarian’s Office Lifts EHM Quarantine

 

On Dec. 6, the State Veterinarian’s Office of the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services released the Equine Herpes Myeloencephalopathy (EHM) quarantine at the Virginia Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine Teaching Hospital in Blacksburg. All exposed horses were closely monitored for fever and compatible clinical signs and kept under strict biosecurity protocol during the quarantine period. No horses developed clinical signs or fever compatible with EHM during the quarantine.

 

Michael Wallace
Assistant Director of Communications
Va. Dept. of Agriculture and Consumer Services
102 Governor St.
Richmond VA 23219
804.786.1904

Virginia Horse Test Positive for Equine Herpesvirus-1

By Informational Articles and News

VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND CONSUMER SERVICES

OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS, www.vdacs.virginia.gov

Contact: Michael Wallace, 804.786.1904

For Release: Thursday, Nov. 21, 2019

Virginia Horse Test Positive for Equine Herpesvirus-1

On Nov. 17, a neurologic horse was admitted to the Virginia Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine (VMCVM) Large Animal Hospital in Blacksburg. The horse deteriorated and was euthanized on Nov. 18. A test for the Equine Herpesvirus-1 (EHV-1), the virus that causes Equine Herpes Myeloencephalopathy, was reported as positive on Nov. 20. In conjunction with the State Veterinarian’s Office of the Virginia Department of Agriculture, all exposed horses at the hospital were immediately isolated from the rest of the hospital population with strict biosecurity protocol and placed under quarantine. All quarantined horses are being monitored twice daily for fever (temperature over 101.50 F) and other clinical signs. The hospital remains open and able to admit patients needing veterinary care.

The farm where the index case resided before going to VMCVM has been placed under quarantine. Horses at this farm are also being monitored for fever and clinical signs. The State Veterinarian’s Office has contacted all other horses that may have been secondarily exposed while at the teaching hospital.

There is no cause for alarm concerning the general horse population in Virginia. EHV-1 is a virus that is present in the environment and found in most horses all over the world. Horses typically are exposed to the virus at a young age with no serious side effects. A large percent of horses carry the virus with no clinical signs for the remainder of their lives. Rarely, exposed horses develop the neurologic form of the disease. Horse owners with concerns should contact their veterinarian.

The Equine Disease Communications Center Biosecurity web pages equinediseasecc.org/biosecurity have more information on best practices for disease prevention in horses and VDACS has more information on EHV-1 at vdacs.virginia.gov/animals-equine-herpes-virus.shtml. Horse owners also may contact VDACS’ Office of Veterinary Services at 804.786.2483.

Equine Education for Animal Control Officers and First Responders

By Informational Articles and News

The Virginia Horse Council and EQ-Knowlege Present:  Equine Education for Animal Control Officers and First Responders

 

 

The Virginia Horse Council is excited to announce an initiative to address the ongoing problem of the lack of information and education regarding equines in Virginia as pertains to emergencies, neglect and abuse cases, and seizures.  To remedy this, we spearheaded a task group of concerned equestrians, including the State Veterinarian’s office, the result of which is “EQ-Knowledge,” who has created a certified course, “Equine Education,” a hands-on based certification course for Animal Control Officers and First Responders.  The Commomwealth of Virginia is home to over 180,000 horses, mules, and donkeys.  Over 500 were seized or surrendered to Animal Control in 2018, and Large Animal Rescue happens frequently.  This 8 hour class provides hands-on horse handling and welfare assessment instruction for ACOs and other First Responders to increase awareness and skill working with these large animals. This course and certification is the first of it’s kind in Virginia and indeed, in the USA.

 

For and overview of the course, please click one of the links below:

Equine Education for ACOs and First Responders In PDF

Equine Education for ACOs and First Responders in PowerPoint

Watershed Implementation May Effect Horse Owners!

By Informational Articles and News

Subject: Important meeting relevant to the equine committee

The Agricultural Best Management Practices Technical Advisory Committee of The Department of Conservation and Recreation will be meeting on July 9th at the Department of Forestry Building, 900 Natural Resource Drive, Charlottesville at 10:00 am.  One of the agenda items will be a presentation relating to local stocking rates for equines as they currently stand in Virginia and other states.  This subject is of particular interest to the equine community as we do not currently have a uniform stocking rate for the state.  Establishment of stocking rates can have a significant impact upon individual equine operations.   We urge members of the equine community to attend this meeting to hear the information presented.  For additional information see the attached fact sheet and infographic.

Info Graphic Sheet

The Commonwealth of Virginia Draft Chesapeake Bay TMLD Phase III Watershed Implementation Plan has been released

Call Now Button